New York

A robbery charge in New York has the potential to change your life. The New York criminal courts take violent crimes like this very seriously, and you are facing severe repercussions for your actions if it can be proven that you are guilty. Discussing your case with a local attorney may help you understand what you are up against and what can be done to possibly avoid a conviction.

Robbery is defined as the forcible taking of property. Because of this, there is an element of violence and this isn’t your typical theft charge.

New York Robbery Laws & Penalties

Under New York Law, robbery is classified into three different categories. The facts of your case and the evidence against you will determine which charge you are faced with.

First Degree Robbery

If you are accused of forcibly taking property and you or another participant in the crime do any of the following, you could face charges of robbery in the 1st degree:

  1. Causing serious physical injury to an alleged victim,
  2. Being armed with a deadly weapon,
  3. Using or threatening the use of a dangerous instrument, or
  4. Displaying a firearm.

First degree robbery is considered a Class B Felony, which carries up to 25 years in prison if convicted.

Second Degree Robbery

You could be charged with robbery in the 2nd degree if you are accused of forcibly taking property and:

  1. You are aided by another person,
  2. Someone is injured in the commission of the act,
  3. What appears to be a firearm is shown in the commission of the act, or
  4. The property in question is a vehicle (as in carjacking).

Robbery in the 2nd degree is classified as a Class C Felony and carries up to 15 years in prison.

Third Degree Robbery

If you are accused of forcibly taking property from another and it doesn’t fit the criteria of the two above mentioned crimes, you could be charged with this Class D Felony. Robbery in the 3rd degree carries a potential 7 years in prison.

If you are accused of robbery, any robbery, you will face felony charges and a potential prison sentence. Though it may seem like your possibilities are bleak, don’t lose hope. As long as you haven’t been convicted, there’s hope.